The Big Lead: “Low Morale at CBS Sports.com as it Eschews Reporting in Favor of Aggregation”

I just stumbled across this Big Lead piece from a day or two ago.  Mr. Elling quoted extensively.  A must read, no two ways about it.

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8 Responses to The Big Lead: “Low Morale at CBS Sports.com as it Eschews Reporting in Favor of Aggregation”

  1. Sports-realist. says:

    So is this a ‘feel sorry for Elling’ article? Elling made the choice to leave football for golf…Sportswriters/media OVERPLAYED their hand in Eldrick…A one trick pony developed, and once the trick was played, it showed how LAME all the sportswriters/media had become…..We were CONTINUALLY told by the media, how golf=Eldrick and vice versa…So the media’s attempt to replace Eldrick is by CONTINUALLY comparing Eldrick to anyone NOW playing, in ENDLESS articles about Eldrick…….Talk about circular logic…..It would be like telling your new girlfriend about your old girlfriend—every day….

    There is NO point in reading today’s CBS sports articles, as most just jump to the COMMENT section these days….WITHOUT the comment section, they would probably lose MOST of their viewers…..Certainly I wouldn’t be on it, except to check sports scores here and there…..

    • lannyh says:

      Yeah, many readers read the headline, then head straight for the comments. How many times has someone said in a comment, “You never mentioned the player spent two years in Miami,” and the article had a couple of paragraphs about when the player was in Miami.

      I didn’t interpret as a “feel sorry for Elling” piece. It just very realistically pointed out how Elling was sent packing because Kyle Porter could pump out “Tiger Buys Awesome New Shirt” (with a link to a tweet or someone else’s article) at a small fraction of the price.

      Of course I agree with you on the golf media putting all their eggs in one basket, and then finding out they were rotten eggs. One line from the piece jumped out at me: “Golf struggled to find anyone remotely interesting to replace Woods, and viewers tuned out.” You probably agree with me that the golf media’s Only Tiger Matters mentality caused that. And their reluctance to move on prevented a natural correction, so to speak. Woods crashed and burned in 2009 and that is the same year Rory won as a teen at Dubai.

      It was time to move on, but the golf media just refused to do so. Also, at some point, they started mining Woods as a race issue. I mean, they always had to some extent, but his play justified the coverage — as heavy as it was — in many years. Since 2009, though, it certainly didn’t. But, yet, like I pointed out yesterday, Kyle Porter, Elling’s replacement, is still obsessing over Woods.

      By the way, I should also remind people that Elling and Hugan were never afraid to take shots at Woods in “Pond Scum.”

    • lannyh says:

      Oh, one other thing I meant to mention, even had Elling stayed with his local newspaper covering football, there was no guarantee that would have lasted. In retrospect, maybe he say it did last, but during that time, newspapers have been closing right and left, have been being purchased right and left, and many of the survivors have gone to three-day-a-week publications. And the future is not bright for any of them, really.

      • Sports-realist. says:

        yep and golf course closings have NOTHING to do with Eldrick playing or not….The media tried to connect those dots somehow in the past, but you have shown the stats simply don’t add up….Lesser people are playing golf, in part because of the economy, and not because a new 20 year old is taking the game by storm nonsense….

    • Sports-realist. says:

      In other words, the media was it’s own worst enemy…

  2. Ken says:

    Did CBS cover the thrilling news that a robot named “Eldrick” got a hole-in-one in Phoenix?

    Apparently if the real Eldrick can’t deliver for them, they’ve decided to build another.

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