Arnold Palmer Invitational Semi Live Blog: Friday, Day Two (running post)

12:55 pm Update

Rory McIlroy, posted a six-under 66, putting himself into great position heading into the weekend.  His round featured a streak of five straight birdies.

Great job by the crew who provided the stream.  The announcers were perfect.  Lowkey and focused on the action at hand.  Just like the Brits do it.  It’s going to make watching the Golf Channel and NBC coverage painful.

12:20 pm Update

Rory pars after five straight birdies.  No way I was going to post and risk killing the rally.  Looking very good right now.

10:20 am Update

What’s the point of the Nike commercial with all the “rich people” in the clubhouse where Tiger Woods walks directly to the practice range?  What is the message they are trying to send?  What demographic are they trying to influence and in what way?

10:00 am Update

I must point out that I predicted before this event that Rickie, Rory, and Jason would all be top ten after two rounds.  They sit now at T-6, T-13, T-6.  Of course, the course is playing fairly easy, so some afternoon scores will probably catch and pass them, but, still, they might yet all be top ten come day’s end.

Rory’s playing like crap, for the most part.  Day and Fowler going through the round pretty much stress-free.

8:30 am Update: Why Lanny is the Best (a blast from the past)

Three years ago, I wrote about Spieth and Justin Thomas the day they met in the NCAA Championship.  What other golf writer did that?

8:25 am Update

The guys on the webstream are doing a great job.  Nice video of the climbing sun and the long shadows over the dewy early morning golf course.  Good stuff.  Day pars.  Rory birdies.  Rickie birdies.  On to hole No. 2  (well, No. 11, actually).

8:00 am Update

The stream is up.  Rory, Jason, and Rickie are the featured group.  They tee off at 11 minutes after the hour.

6:41 am

Rory McIlroy tees off  1-1/2 hour from now.  He struck the ball decently yesterday, but the putts would not fall, and he got a bad break on one hole when his approach shot was blocked from rolling close the hole by another player’s ball.  I’d like to see him go low today and put himself in the hunt, even be the front-runner.  He could put a good round together today, because the morning groups have the advantage due to, it would appear, the greens getting bumpy in the afternoon.

Justin Thomas posted a -3.  Let’s see if he can finally put four good rounds together and contend.  Jason Day shot -3; Rickie Fowler shot -1.

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9 Responses to Arnold Palmer Invitational Semi Live Blog: Friday, Day Two (running post)

  1. Ken says:

    http://m.bleacherreport.com/articles/2402402-tiger-woods-rapid-decline-is-not-as-shocking-as-it-may-seem

    Sorry to be off topic Lanny, but this is a great article. It’s almost word for word what I’ve posted in various forums over the past year or so and it’s good to see someone publishing the same thoughts. Should be required reading for those who think that Woods is somehow going to be a top player until he’s 55.

    • lannyh says:

      Don’t worry about being off topic. I’ll go give it a read right now.

    • lannyh says:

      Good article. Very straightforward, rational, and to-the-point. I wish the rest of the golf media would face the reality. Fitzpatrick makes a good point that the golf media often says, “Nicklaus was still winning majors at 46,” when that was a case of catching lightning in a bottle. In Jack’s case, you can almost push the age back to 38. He won only 5 more events after that; it just so happened that three were majors.

      You might could include Mickelson, too, although he’s been average a win a year the past five years. But, prior to age forty, he had six consecutive multi-win seasons, so while he didn’t totally lose his game, he did fall off some. I think the Woods cheerleaders mindset also had some of this in it: “Tiger is better than Phil, and Phil is still competing and winning into his mid 40’s, so Tiger will at least do that.” Overlooking the fact that Phil is just a naturally big and strong guy with a smooth swing and easy-going demeanor, things conducive to a long career.

      Thanks for the heads-up on the article.

      • Ken says:

        I’ve long been a fan of Phil, but as you point out his wins slowed drastically at 40. He may catch that lightning, but mostly he’s done. Snead won at 52 and played amazing golf past 60, twice almost winning the PGA, but his wins mostly stopped in his early forties. If Player’s fitness couldn’t stop his decline, why would Woods be able to beat Time?

        It happens in every sport as guys near 40, the wins decline. Auto racing, bowling, even chess. I think it’s more mental than physical. A lot of golfers play great and hit it long well into their fifties, but they can’t put four rounds together. I think that the ability to concentrate under intense pressure fades as you age.

        A few years ago, Langer got off to a hot start in the final round at Augusta and I really thought that he would be the first major winner over 50. I think he was 53 at the time. He faded away by the start of the back nine.

  2. Ken says:

    That commercial sounds funny, considering that Woods is the richest of the rich guys.

    Runs rather counter to one of the current memes, that his game is in decline because his devotion to family just doesn’t allow for much practice.

  3. Sports-realist says:

    Adam Scott isn’t the same golfer since the putter change…

    • lannyh says:

      Yeah, I just saw a miss. It’s painful to watch.

      • Ken says:

        He really wasn’t much of a putter with that broomstick either.

      • lannyh says:

        I was thinking that would help him stick with his transiition; he could even think of it as an improvement. But now I don’t know. I guess it takes time.

        I’m still kind of miffed they made the putter rule change, but nothing on balls and the rest of the clubs.

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