FRANK NOBILO SHOCKER: Tiger Woods Wins in 2000 Equipment-Aided

In a further blow to the image of Tiger Woods, Frank Nobilo has told Reuters the PGA Tour “wasn’t a fair fight” in 2000-2001 because Woods was using a different type of ball from other tour players.

(Reuters) – Tiger Woods ruled golf in 2000 in a manner that may never be matched, but one of his peers may have an insight into one of the reasons for that dominance.

“Everybody now is using the same type of equipment so it’s hard for any one player to get that technological jump ahead that I believe Tiger had in 2000.

“He obviously had skills, too, but that’s why it wasn’t a fair fight.”

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8 Responses to FRANK NOBILO SHOCKER: Tiger Woods Wins in 2000 Equipment-Aided

  1. Anonymous says:

    During the 2000 Open at St. Andrews the presenters said Woods avoided all the bunkers because he hit the ball so far. I am no longer impressed.

    • lannyh says:

      I remember that, too. I want to say he didn’t hit a bunker all week. Between Galea and this revelation, Woods’s ability is looking more and more ordinary. What gets me is why Nobillo waited until Woods is on the threshhold of retirement to mention this little tidbit. For fifteen years, we’ve been told what a great feat the “Tiger Slam” was, and now we find out it was due to special equipment.

      • Sports-realist says:

        well, it’s not like the other were using non metal clubs, but it would be interesting if tests were done to compare the equipment, and was Nike that far ahead of everyone else or what was going on, that the rest of the league missed the boat on balls and clubs at that time…

      • lannyh says:

        Titleist was and is the predominant ball on the Tour. Titleist came out with their version, the ProV1 the next year, and soon all the Tour players switched to it. Average driving distance that year took a six yard leap forward.

  2. Ken says:

    Were the balls available to anyone and Woods was an early adopter? Or did Nike make it available only to him?

    Since balls have to be approved, it’s kind of hard to believe that other players couldn’t have made the same switch.

    • lannyh says:

      Well, at that time, Woods was only player playing Nike balls pretty much. Duval starting using them and — voila! — became world number one. The other players either didn’t know the solid core balls were anything special, or perhaps they had sponsorship deals that kept them from going to Nike balls. Titleist came out with their Pro V1 a year later and the Tour converted en masse. Driving distance increased six yards that year.

      Solid core balls had always been available for amateurs for the extra distance, but they were not accurate enough for the pros. Nike made the solid core balls as accurate as the wound balata balls. It wasn’t illegal, what he did, but it gave him a great advantage.

  3. Anonymous says:

    This is kind of a moot point. Anyone could have played these balls and it’s the fault of the other players for not jumping on that band wagon soon enough. However, the unfairness in the subsequent years is that once players started using the solid core balls, Tiger decided to ‘up’ his game with PEDS. Now that is unfair.

    • lannyh says:

      It was not illegal. I think it was unfair, but that’s not to say he was wrong to do it. What was wrong was for the golf media to pretend Woods’s dominance that year was attributable to skill.

      I agree regarding the PEDs. It’s a natural progression. He was pushing the boundaries of fairplay with the balls, and he probably did the same with PEDs. Prior to the PGA Tour’s anti-doping policy, that too would have also been legal.

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